About

300x300xCopy-of-EnerKnol_AM-0271-e1404850244626-300x300.jpg.pagespeed.ic.hJe177vgOxAngelique Mercurio is the Founder and CEO of EnerKnol, the energy policy data and analytics startup recognized by the White House as one of “America’s leading private sector innovators using open data to solve the nation’s most pressing energy challenges”.

Prior to becoming a technology entrepreneur, Angelique cultivated her energy policy expertise on the commodities trading desk at Barclays Capital, where she launched US Environmental Markets research products and advised the firm’s energy traders, hedge fund and corporate clients, private equity portfolio companies, and investment banking and regulatory affairs executives firmwide, on policy impacts to energy markets.  Her earlier career experience draws from a decade on Wall Street including equity analyst and investment banking roles at Citi, Merrill Lynch, and Lazard.

Angelique is passionate about breaking down barriers to energy innovation through efficient access to the critical regulatory information needed for investment decisions.  She speaks frequently at industry events, has been an author on more than 200 research publications to date, and her work is widely featured by industry trade journals and media outlets including the Wall Street Journal, Crain’s, Greentech Media, Cleantech IQ, Breaking Gov, CNBC and Fox Business News.  Angelique was named one of New York’s “Top Ten Energy Entrepreneurs” in 2013 and 2014 by Breaking Energy, and in 2015 was named to the Techweek100, Techweek’s annual list of the most distinguished technology organizations and their leaders.

Angelique earned an MBA from MIT Sloan, and currently serves as the Director of Energy Programs for the MIT Alumni Club of NY.  She earned a BA in Economics from NYU, where she graduated cum laude in three years while working full time as a junior banker at Lazard.  In her spare time, she enjoys fostering homeless Chihuahuas.  She describes herself as “unreasonable“.  Simply put, Angelique doesn’t get stopped by “reasons”.